Publications

Oklahoma Heritage Association Publishing, the publishing arm of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, has printed more than 160 books celebrating Oklahoma's rich history and heritage, making the OHAP the leader in publishing Oklahoma's history. To place a book order and view available book titles, please visit our Museum Store online or call 405.235.4458.

For more information about our publishing arm, call Gini Moore Campbell, vice president, at 405.523.3202, or e-mail her at gmc@OklahomaHoF.com.


New Releases

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Making Things Better: Wes Watkins' Legacy of Leadership | $24.95
By Kim D. Parrish


Written by award-winning author Judge Kim D.Parrish, Making Things Better tells of one common man’s trek through history. Marching with a confidence fueled by poverty, personal insecurities, a serious speech impediment, uneducated parents and an alcoholic father, Watkins rode his passion to be elected repeatedly to one of the country’s most powerful positions.
 

  On God's Polishing Wheel: The Life of Kurt Leichter | $19.95
By Kurt Leichter with Cathy Leichter 



   I Am Oklahoma Children's Series | $9.95 per book

A series designed for elementary level children. Each book in the series focuses on a different individual and teaches students about the extraordinary accomplishments of notable and lesser known Oklahomans.
If the Fence Could Talk
Written by Brad Robison and illustrated by Margaret Hoge | $19.95

On April 19, 1995,Oklahoma City was changed forever when the unforgivable act of one individual took the lives of 168 men, women, and children and injured hundreds more. Following the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, a fence was stretched around two city blocks to protect the site during the rescue and recovery efforts.

If the Fence Could Talk shares what the fence became in the days, months and years that followed for the rescue workers, family members, friends and strangers who gathered at the site. From teddy bears and t-shirts to notes and flowers, for more than 20 years the fence has been a place where people come to remember. With a section remaining permanently, the fence remains a place of worship, solace, hope and tears.